Coughs - All You Need To Know

MOST COUGHS ARE CAUSED BY
COLDS AND FLU

but there can be other reasons why you can develop one.1

Read on for all the cough information you need: causes, symptoms, and what’s good for them.

MOST COUGHS ARE CAUSED BY
COLDS AND FLU

but there can be other reasons why you can develop one.1

Read on for all the cough information you need: causes, symptoms and what’s good for them.

WHAT CAUSES
A COUGH?

Most coughs are caused by colds or flu. Other causes can include smoking, heartburn, allergies (hay fever, for example), infections such as bronchitis, mucus dripping down the throat from the back of the nose and – very rarely, something more serious. It should clear up on its own within three to four weeks.1

A cough is a reflex action to clear away a foreign particle from the airway. The mechanics are complex, involving the nervous system the bronchial tree and the stomach muscles. The reflex starts when receptors in the body’s vagus nerve are stimulated. A full inhale almost fills the lungs, the glottis at the back of the throat closes and the stomach walls contract. The glottis opens suddenly, with an upward heave of the diaphragm, and air is sent out at the rate of up to 600 (95km) an hour. Three different stomach muscles force out the air. If stomach muscles are weak, the cough isn’t as effective.2

Although coughs are typically caused by common colds, flu or bronchitis, there are other reasons such as smoke, dust and the drying effects of air conditioning which can all irritate the airways and bring on a cough. Also, an allergic condition known as rhinitis. And some medicines (ACE-inhibitors, for example, prescribed for the treatment of high blood pressure or cardiovascular disease). In children, a persistent cough can indicate a more serious respiratory tract infection such as whooping cough.3

THE
DIFFERENT KIND OF COUGHS

Coughs that are acute and short term tend to be caused by infection to the upper respiratory tract, which affects the throat. This is known as a URTI or URI. Typical examples are flu, a common cold or laryngitis.

Infection to the lower respiratory tract affects the lungs and/or the airways lower down from the windpipe. Typical examples of this are bronchitis or pneumonia.

Chronic, longer-lasting coughs can be caused by smoking, asthma, mucus dripping down from the throat to the back of the nose, and some medications.4

CHESTY/MUCUS COUGH

A chesty or mucus cough is sometimes called a ‘productive’ cough, when coughing is your body’s way of getting rid of mucus in the chest.

BRONCHITIS

This type of cough produces yellow-grey mucus or phlegm and is normally accompanied by cold-like symptoms such as stuffy nose, headache, and fatigue.

Antibiotics aren’t suitable for most people with bronchitis, because the condition is usually caused by a virus, not a bacterial infection.5

DRY AND TICKLY COUGH

A dry and tickly (non-productive) cough is when the throat doesn’t produce any mucus or phlegm, resulting in irritation. It feels tickly, hence its name.

Demulcents can include water, hard candy, lemon, honey, menthol or a simple syrup.5

POST-VIRAL COUGH

A post-viral cough can commonly appear after an upper respiratory tract infection due to throat inflammation. It’s rarely bacterial.

WHEN TO
VISIT YOUR GP

A cough will usually clear up on its own within three to four weeks, you shouldn’t need to see a GP.

That said, you should consider seeing a GP if: 1

you’ve had a persistent cough lasting more than 3 weeks
your cough is very bad or quickly gets worse
you’re pregnant
you’re finding it hard to breathe
you feel very unwell
your immune system is weak, through chemotherapy for example
you have chest pain
you’re coughing up blood - this is very urgent
you’re losing weight for no reason
COPING WITH A COUGH

How long your cough lasts can depend on what’s causing it. It should go away on its own within a few weeks, when your immune system has fought off the virus.

Meanwhile, you should rest, drink plenty of fluids and you may find a hot drink with lemon and honey can help.1

While coughing has a useful purpose in ridding the lungs of irritants and excess mucus, coughing at night can interrupt sleep. It’s usually caused by lying flat in bed. Mucus can pool in the back of the throat, which activates the coughing. It’s known as postnasal drip, and it can be remedied by sleeping with the head raised. Try propping up your head with an extra pillow or two or use a back wedge. A change in sleep position allows mucus to flow, to minimise coughing.6

Lemsip has a range of over the counter remedies, designed specifically for your symptoms. Just pop into your local pharmacy or supermarket. If you’re not sure which one is best for you, speak to the pharmacist.

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SOURCES

1. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/cough/ 2. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/cough-reflex 3. https://www.lemsip.co.uk/blogs/symptoms-advice/causes-of-a-cough 4. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/220349.php#causes 5. https://contemporaryclinic.pharmacytimes.com/acute-care/5-acute-cough-types-and-how-to-treat-them-appropriately 6. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319498.php