The first signs of a cold
October 2021
COLDS
COME ON
GRAUDALLY

Those first tell-tale symptoms can start with a tickle in your throat, a runny nose, headaches, and feeling more tired than usual.1

Even if you can carry on as usual, you probably don’t want a cold sticking around. Luckily you can treat a cold at home with ease.

Looking for a
Cold hack?

Mention you’ve got a cold and people will start offering you their ‘miracle’ remedies like lemon and ginger juices, onions in socks and acupuncture. As delicious as your nan’s chicken soup is, it’s unfortunately not proven to help stop a cold. Maybe you’ve tried a few of these and wondered if they really work, or you’ve got your own repertoire of remedies. Find out the truth about the myths.

Myth: “You can sweat out a cold”
Truth is, it may provide temporary symptom relief, but won’t help stop a cold early.2
Myth: “Chicken Soup can stop a cold”
Truth is, it’s delicious but won’t help stop a cold early. It has been shown to help reduce upper respiratory infections, though.3
Myth: “Vitamin C is the ultimate cure.”
Truth is, oranges, limes and lemons come with health benefits, giving you the vitamin C that your immune system needs, but it won’t help stop a cold entirely.3
How to
Treat a cold

Treating a cold at home is simple:

Get some rest
Keep warm
Drink plenty of water
Gargle with saltwater (not suitable for children). 1
However, the real question is, can you help reduce cold symptoms early?
Help stop a cold early
Lemsip First Action Nasal Spray
However, the real question is, can you help reduce cold symptoms early? At the first signs of a cold, spray Lemsip First Action once into each nostril. It forms a shielding layer to help stop cold viruses from multiplying or infecting healthy cells. Trapped virus particles are then cleared naturally through your nasal passages, which helps to stop your cold from developing further.
Lemsip First Action Nasal Spray helps to stop your cold when used at the first signs, by trapping cold viruses. Lemsip first action is a medical device for use at the first signs of a common cold. Always read the instructions. RB-M-53787
Sources:

1. NHS > Conditions > Common cold
Common Cold
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/common-cold/

2. Healthline > Can you sweat out a cold?
Medically reviewed by Kevin Martinez, M.D. — Written by Jill Seladi-Schulman, Ph.D. on June 30, 2021
https://www.healthline.com/health/can-you-sweat-out-a-cold

3. Healthline > Cold and Flu
11 Cold and Flu remedies
Medically reviewed by Elaine K. Luo, M.D.
https://www.healthline.com/health/cold-flu/home-remedies#echinacea